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1) Point Out The Obvious
Show them the obvious. Have you heard the saying that God is in the details? Well, your audience will most likely find their aha-moments in the details.

Pay attention to things that your audience overlooks and bring it to their attention while you’re making a point. That’s a powerful strategy.

It’s like they are heading in one direction in their minds, then you jerk their chain and completely switch their direction of thinking. Let’s look at an example; I’m going to make it up.

We all know that cars are driven forward. What if you ask the audience to imagine that for one day every car on the street is going backward.

Of course, you would have to make a point about it. But…it’s so unusual that it makes them have to stop and think.

Are you beginning to see what I mean? This can be applicable to anything that people already have a set of beliefs about. Your job is to reveal the obvious to them.

It’s almost like they are daydreaming and completely missing it. Bam! You point it out.

2) Bring Them Hope
There’s not a powerful speech since the beginning of ages that does not have an element of hope in it. The reality is people will pay anything for hope.

Think of it this way; if you can paint a fabulous picture in my mind of how I will look and feel when I lose those 30 pounds, you can get in my wallet fast. Alright, I’m not overweight. It’s just an example.